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Rabbi Avrohom Hoffman

Rabbi Avrohom Hoffman was born and raised in Baltimore, MD. After graduating Yeshivas Chofetz Chaim / Talmudical Academy of Baltimore he spent two years learning in Yeshivat HaNegev in Netivot, Israel. This was followed by two years in Rav Shmuel Brudny’s Shiur in the Mirrer Yeshiva of Brooklyn and four years in MTJ/Yeshiva of Staten Island, where he received Semicha from Rav Reuven Feinstein Sh”lita. It was there he was introduced to his wife Miriam (nee Lasdun) and they spent the first year of their marriage in the Kollel there. In 1979 they accepted an invitation to join the Kollel of Bais Medrash Jeshurun (Breuers Kollel) here in Washington Heights where he learned for another two years. After a brief stint working for K’hal Adath Jeshurun, Rabbi Hoffman worked as a computer programmer for five years before joining Yeshiva Rabbi S. R. Hirsch as seventh grade Rebbi in 1986. Aside from a two-year stint in the Yeshiva Ketana of Long Island and a few afternoon positions in other Yeshivos, Rabbi Hoffman has been a Rebbi in the Breuers Yeshiva ever since, currently teaching first grade after having served in various capacities including High School Secular Studies Principal for 6 years. Rabbi Hoffman is also a licensed NY State EMT.

In 1996, when Rabbi Avrohom Gross ZT”L announced his impending retirement to Eretz Yisroel, Rabbi Hoffman was enlisted to assume the Rabbinical leadership of Congregation Shaare Hatikvah Ahavath Torah V’Tikvoh Chadoshoh, where he has served with dignity ever since. Rabbi Hoffman holds a BS in Management and Communication and an MS in Education, both from Adelphi University, as well as a post-graduate certificate in Organizational Management from Touro College. He is a licensed teacher in both New York and New Jersey.

Rabbi and Mrs. Hoffman have 9 children and many grandchildren, keyn yirbu! Their Shabbos table is always open for guests, and all members of their family have consistently been contributing members to the welfare of the Washington Heights Jewish community.